The Highpointers Foundation
Dedicated to education, support and conservation
of the highest point in each of the 50 United States.
State Highpoints – Utah - 13,528-foot Kings Peak

Utah’s highest peak and the seventh highest US state summit, 13,528-foot Kings Peak, is a remote peak in the heart of the Uintas in northeast Utah. The summit of Kings is about 10 miles from the standard Henry’s Fork Trailhead at 9,420 feet, and most peak baggers do a backpack for this summit, however the ultra fit have done the peak in a day. The vertical gain from the Henry’s Fork Trailhead to Kings’ summit is 4,110 feet, which is less than other higher state summits. One advantage of a backpack, is that you can climb many other peaks that surround Kings. In modern times, and on a summer holiday weekend, the area can be quite crowded. There is a trail most of the way, and people place their high camp from Dollar Lake at 10,785 feet on up into the basin near 11,000 feet. The route from there to the summit follows the trail to Gunsight Pass at 11,888 feet, then follows a sometimes vague use trail up through some rocky ledges to reach a large talus field. You can also stick to the trail, descend a little, and circumvent the rocks. Either way, hike west along a trail through talus to reach Anderson Pass at 12,700 feet. You are now on the North-northwest Ridge of Kings Peak. Turn south and follow this ridge to the summit. The Class 2 hike up this rocky ridge fools some people, because there are several false summits along the way. On the summit, you will have expansive views of the Uinta mountains in every direction, and you can study many other attractive peaks. If you are fit, and a bit fanatical, you can trek another 0.8 mile south-southwest to reach 13,512-foot South Kings Peak. In the past, this summit was considered to be the highest peak in Utah, but with modern measurements, we know that it is only the second highest. However, South Kings still clings to the title of a former state summit. You can also reach South Kings, and hence Kings, from the Swift Creek Trailhead to the south at 8,100 feet, but this requires more miles and elevation gain. Like most Rocky Mountain peaks, summer thunder storms are common. Start early.

Highpointers Foundation Projects – Kings Peak
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2010 –> 2017 - Amount of financial assistance: roughly $2,500
The Highpointers Foundation provided funds for a large framed 50 Flags Poster, commemorating the events of September 11, 2001, which was delivered to the USFS Ranger District office in Mountain View, WY. This office administers the northern approach to Kings Peak, a.k.a. the Henrys Fork Trailhead. The US Forest Service is well aware of the many Highpointers who pass through and inquire about Kings Peak, and they are a strong ally to the highpointing hobby. This was the first collaboration between the Highpointers Foundation and a federal ownership administration, the USFS, for the benefit of a highpoint. Lorie is on the left, Whitney on the right.

With funds from the Highpointers Foundation, a bench was added to the Henry’s Fork Trailhead north of King’s Peak in 2012. Wilderness trail signs were placed in 2013 and 2014 to replace worn out signs that had served for decades, and again in 2017.



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